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  • Dear Readers!

    Equal opportunities are a tricky subject. It goes without saying, of course, that we believe all children should have the same opportunities to give them a fair start in life – no matter where they may be born. Indeed, we would consider it to be highly unfair if it weren’t the case. When it comes to equal opportunities in the waste management industry, however, Germany has created a seriously unfair competitive situation that is not only inefficient but also a financial burden for taxpayers and the private sector. The issue here is value added tax (VAT). Municipal companies are exempt from charging VAT and so have a price advantage of up to 19% over their private sector competitors. Whilst privately run firms are subject to VAT laws, municipal businesses are not – even though they provide exactly the same service. The results: privately owned companies are being pushed out of the market by state-owned monopolies, private sector jobs are being put at risk, revenue from business tax and VAT is falling, which, in the end, impacts negatively on local authorities. A recent legal report published by Professor Roman Seer from the Institute for Tax Law and Tax Procedure Law at the Ruhr University in Bochum has revealed that this system is in breach of the law – with consumers paying a heavy price.

    Rhenus Recycling has now become REMONDIS Recycling – an excellent addition to REMONDIS’ portfolio. All glass, plastics and textile recycling activities are now in the hands of the recycling specialists REMONDIS. Thanks to this move, the company’s customers will benefit from an even bigger and more closely knit network of recycling locations. The deposit return system for managing the return of drinks bottles and cans is also part of this portfolio and will also be run under REMONDIS’ name in the future. One of the reasons why German consumers do not need to return bottles to the supermarket they actually bought them from is because REMONDIS Recycling operates seven counting centres for disposable bottles across the whole of Germany and offers a reliable IT system with comprehensive billing services for food retailers and industrial businesses. Welcome to REMONDIS.

    It is extremely important in these turbulent times for companies to be aware of their social responsibilities. This is perhaps a little easier for REMONDIS being a provider of recycling services as it has an excellent sustainability record and can offer 33,000 people a permanent job – but there is always more that can be done. Whether it be investing in educational projects such as the RECYCLING PROFESSIONALS, helping to make children more traffic aware to keep them safe on our roads or donating a vacuum truck to improve living conditions at a refugee camp in Iraq. REMONDIS and all its employees work hard each and every day to make our world that little bit better. Maybe this was the reason why 632 young people have chosen to start an apprenticeship at our company this year – ‘working for the future’. A very big welcome to all our new colleagues at REMONDIS.

    Yours

    Max Köttgen

A new wind turbine 195 metres high

A new wind turbine has gone online in Lüdenscheid in the region of South Westphalia. Initiated and financed by the Stadtwerke Iserlohn (utilities company) and ENERVIE, the building and testing work on the turbine was successfully completed according to schedule – a spectacular sight, with a 600-tonne crawler crane gradually installing the 24 round concrete segments one by one. 46 metres of steel, consisting of two round components, were then added to the 87-metre concrete tower. All in all, the wind turbine (plus its rotor blades) now measures 195 metres from top to bottom and can be found on the edge of the Verse Dam.

Around 5 million euros invested

The project began back in the summer of 2016 when Mark-E, a fully owned subsidiary of ENERVIE, and Stadtwerke Iserlohn founded the joint venture, Windkraft Versetalsperre GmbH & Co KG. Together, the two partners have invested around 5 million euros to build this three megawatt wind turbine. Situated on the windiest spot of the Verse Dam around 460 metres above sea level, they are expecting it to produce approx. 7.5 million kilowatt hours of green, environmentally friendly electricity every year. Enough power, therefore, to cover the needs of more than 2,000 average households. Looking at the current electricity mix in Germany, this wind turbine will reduce carbon emissions by ca. 110,000 tonnes over a 20-year period.

  • “Everyone involved in this project did an excellent job from start to finish.”

    Erik Höhne, ENERVIE Board Spokesman

ENERVIE in charge of the technical operations

“Everyone involved in this project did an excellent job from start to finish. We now hope that the turbine’s operations will run smoothly,” commented Erik Höhne, ENERVIE board spokesman, summing up the work so far. Mark-E developed and implemented the project itself with its own personnel and its own know-how. It was responsible for the whole of the infrastructure and monitored the building work every step of the way. Dr Klaus Weimer, managing director of Stadtwerke Iserlohn, and Erik Höhne joined representatives of all the companies involved in the construction work to see the key being handed over to officially open the turbine. The Enervie Group will continue to be in charge of the technical operations whilst the project financing and the commercial operations remain in the hands of Stadtwerke Iserlohn.

The Verse Dam wind turbine: a few facts & figures:
Building work began:August 2016
Building work ended / turbine commissioned:end of March 2017
Investment sum:ca. 5 million euros
Type of wind turbine:Enercon E-115
Capacity:3 megawatts
Total height:195 metres
Expected power output / year:ca. 7.5 million kilowatt hours (kWh)
Carbon emission savings / year*:ca. 5,500 tonnes
Operator:Windkraft Versetalsperre GmbH & Co. KG

*compared to the German electricity mix
Source: ENERVIE – Südwestfalen Energie und Wasser AG

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