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  • Dear Readers!

    Germany has set itself some ambitious goals in its move to support global efforts to reduce emissions of ozone-depleting gases – first and foremost CO2. On signing the Kyoto Protocol, the governments agreed to reduce emissions so that global temperature increases are limited to below 2 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels. According to the Federal government, Germany’s contribution is to have cut its emissions by at least 40 percent by 2020 and by 80 to 95 percent by 2050 compared to carbon emission levels in 1990. This goal should primarily be reached by extending the country’s network of renewable energy sources and increasing energy efficiency.

    Germany has set itself some ambitious goals in its move to support global efforts to reduce emissions of ozone-depleting gases – first and foremost CO2. On signing the Kyoto Protocol, the governments agreed to reduce emissions so that global temperature increases are limited to below 2 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels. According to the Federal government, Germany’s contribution is to have cut its emissions by at least 40 percent by 2020 and by 80 to 95 percent by 2050 compared to carbon emission levels in 1990. This goal should primarily be reached by extending the country’s network of renewable energy sources and increasing energy efficiency.

    The country’s simultaneous exit from nuclear power, however, has been like starting an experiment with an uncertain outcome. It has certainly got the network technicians reacting nervously to the slightest glitch in the system – as could be seen recently during the partial solar eclipse in Germany. In extreme cases, there can be fluctuations of up to fourteen gigawatts an hour – the result of the rapid growth of renewable energy sources – and these must be compensated for with electricity generated from fossil fuels. This is making it extremely difficult for the Federal government to reach its climate goals and so it is essential that moves are made to find alternative ways of cutting emissions. This is where the recycling sector can help. Aside from the fact that our sector is the only industry to have succeeded in completely turning itself around – from being an emitter of greenhouse gases as a result of sending organic material to landfill, to cutting carbon emissions through recycling and thermal treatment – there are still a number of other ways it can help prevent climate change. If the government makes the necessary adjustments now, i.e. with its new recyclables law, and ensures that the very most is made of the material and thermal potential of the recyclables in our waste, then our sector alone can achieve 6% of the 2020 climate goals. This has been proven by studies carried out by the Fraunhofer UMSICHT Institute. 

    Being one of the largest recycling, water and service companies, REMONDIS is already making an important contribution towards preventing climate change and conserving our planet’s natural resources. We would be very happy to be allowed to do even more. Introducing organic waste bins across the country is an important step towards achieving a more sustainable future. More and more often the public and private sectors are approaching each other to find ways of protecting the environment together to ensure future generations also have a world worth living in. Whilst it is certainly too early to say there has been a complete change of heart, one fact remains true: the public and private sectors are stronger when they work together – especially when they are looking to achieve ambitious goals!

    The term ‘sustainability’ may have been overused in recent years but it still depicts best the challenges that all industrial and commercial businesses must face – both now and in the future. Many of our customers have added our sustainability certificate to their business models. The Steigenberger hotel group, for example, has not only achieved the best recycling rates in their industry thanks to REMONDIS, their “Green Meeting“ concept, verified by our sustainability certificate, has given this successful hotel business a truly unique selling point. We are happy to help wherever we can! 

    Yours

    Thomas Conzendorf

The New Year brought changes

Changes were made to the board of directors and supervisory board of RETHMANN Beteiligungs SE at the beginning of the year as well as to the boards of its three divisional companies, effectively passing on the business to the younger generation. As part of this transformation, RETHMANN SE & Co. KG has moved into the background by becoming a financial holding company and giving its autonomous divisional companies, REMONDIS, Rhenus and SARIA, more powers to make their own decisions.

Changes to the supervisory board and boards of directors

Dr Peter Nölke, aged 71, stepped down from the supervisory board of RETHMANN Beteiligungs SE on 31 December 2014. He had been a member of the board since 1999 actively supporting the company with his invaluable experience and advice for 15 years. “On behalf of all the RETHMANN Group shareholders, I would like to thank Dr Nölke for his dedication, his advice and his constructive criticism over the years,” said Dr Martin Rethmann, chairman of the supervisory board of RETHMANN Beteiligungs SE.

The supervisory board and boards of directors have taken the next step to systematically further develop the business this family-run company has been operating for over 80 years to ensure its long-running success story continues.

Reinhard Lohmann also stepped down from the board of directors of RETHMANN Beteiligungs SE on 31 December 2014 to join the company’s supervisory board. He has been part of the group’s senior management team for over 35 years – the last 7 years as chairman of the board of directors. Over this period, the company’s turnover has grown from 35 million deutschmarks to over 12 billion euros. Dr Martin Rethmann commented: “This growth alone is indicative of the depth of appreciation and gratitude of the family shareholders for Mr Lohmann’s contribution. We are really pleased that Mr Lohmann will continue to play an advisory role as deputy chair of the supervisory board of RETHMANN Beteiligungs SE and be involved in the further development of the company.” Board directors are now Ludger and Klemens Rethmann, with Klemens Rethmann holding the position of board spokesperson.

Not only personnel changes were made

Dr Martin Rethmann has been appointed chairman of the supervisory board of both REMONDIS and SARIA. Holding the position of deputy chairman of the supervisory boards of both companies, Reinhard Lohmann will continue to contribute towards the development of both businesses in the future. REMONDIS’ supervisory board remains otherwise unchanged.

In the 35 years that Reinhard Lohmann led the company as board chairman, the business’ turnover grew from 35 million deutschmarks to around 12 billion euros. He has now joined the supervisory board.

Having made these changes to the various boards, the shareholders of RETHMANN SE & Co. KG decided that the three divisional companies, REMONDIS SE & Co. KG, SARIA SE & Co. KG and Rhenus SE & Co. KG, should be given greater decision-making powers. The amendments that needed to be made to the companies’ rules of operation to make this possible were approved during the relevant meetings of the supervisory boards of the three divisions and the parent company – thus ensuring that the intended goal of giving greater decision-making powers to the autonomous divisions of the RETHMANN Group was put into effect. A further step has been taken, therefore, to transform RETHMANN SE & Co. KG from a management to a purely financial holding.

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