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  • Dear Readers!

    Germany has set itself some ambitious goals in its move to support global efforts to reduce emissions of ozone-depleting gases – first and foremost CO2. On signing the Kyoto Protocol, the governments agreed to reduce emissions so that global temperature increases are limited to below 2 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels. According to the Federal government, Germany’s contribution is to have cut its emissions by at least 40 percent by 2020 and by 80 to 95 percent by 2050 compared to carbon emission levels in 1990. This goal should primarily be reached by extending the country’s network of renewable energy sources and increasing energy efficiency.

    Germany has set itself some ambitious goals in its move to support global efforts to reduce emissions of ozone-depleting gases – first and foremost CO2. On signing the Kyoto Protocol, the governments agreed to reduce emissions so that global temperature increases are limited to below 2 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels. According to the Federal government, Germany’s contribution is to have cut its emissions by at least 40 percent by 2020 and by 80 to 95 percent by 2050 compared to carbon emission levels in 1990. This goal should primarily be reached by extending the country’s network of renewable energy sources and increasing energy efficiency.

    The country’s simultaneous exit from nuclear power, however, has been like starting an experiment with an uncertain outcome. It has certainly got the network technicians reacting nervously to the slightest glitch in the system – as could be seen recently during the partial solar eclipse in Germany. In extreme cases, there can be fluctuations of up to fourteen gigawatts an hour – the result of the rapid growth of renewable energy sources – and these must be compensated for with electricity generated from fossil fuels. This is making it extremely difficult for the Federal government to reach its climate goals and so it is essential that moves are made to find alternative ways of cutting emissions. This is where the recycling sector can help. Aside from the fact that our sector is the only industry to have succeeded in completely turning itself around – from being an emitter of greenhouse gases as a result of sending organic material to landfill, to cutting carbon emissions through recycling and thermal treatment – there are still a number of other ways it can help prevent climate change. If the government makes the necessary adjustments now, i.e. with its new recyclables law, and ensures that the very most is made of the material and thermal potential of the recyclables in our waste, then our sector alone can achieve 6% of the 2020 climate goals. This has been proven by studies carried out by the Fraunhofer UMSICHT Institute. 

    Being one of the largest recycling, water and service companies, REMONDIS is already making an important contribution towards preventing climate change and conserving our planet’s natural resources. We would be very happy to be allowed to do even more. Introducing organic waste bins across the country is an important step towards achieving a more sustainable future. More and more often the public and private sectors are approaching each other to find ways of protecting the environment together to ensure future generations also have a world worth living in. Whilst it is certainly too early to say there has been a complete change of heart, one fact remains true: the public and private sectors are stronger when they work together – especially when they are looking to achieve ambitious goals!

    The term ‘sustainability’ may have been overused in recent years but it still depicts best the challenges that all industrial and commercial businesses must face – both now and in the future. Many of our customers have added our sustainability certificate to their business models. The Steigenberger hotel group, for example, has not only achieved the best recycling rates in their industry thanks to REMONDIS, their “Green Meeting“ concept, verified by our sustainability certificate, has given this successful hotel business a truly unique selling point. We are happy to help wherever we can! 

    Yours

    Thomas Conzendorf

Modern water management

  • The REMONDIS Aqua Group is continuing to expand in Poland – purchasing a 40 percent share in a company owned by the Trzemeszno city and district authorities in June 2014. Thanks to this acquisition, a further town in Poland is now benefiting from the innovative advantages of a public private partnership as well as from REMONDIS’ experience of operating modern water management systems.

Responsible for plant operations

An agreement was drawn up between the parties that was able to satisfy their various needs and interests. As a result, REMONDIS has acquired a minority shareholding in the municipal company, Zaklat Gospodarki Kommunalnej w Wyszogrodzie Sp. z o. o. (ZGK), and assumed responsibility for managing the company’s operations.

Bespoke concepts will also be needed in the future so that local authorities can work together with specialists to master the ever growing challenges in their water management sectors.

The city and district of Wyszogrod is situated on high ground west of Warsaw and looks down on the impressive Vistula River (Polish: Wisła). Located on such an exposed area, it is extremely important that the best possible processes are used to clean the wastewater generated there before it is discharged into the river. State-of-the-art technology is needed to further improve the quality of the water flowing through the Vistula.

200km of drinking water and wastewater pipes

  • One of the initial goals of this new partnership, which began on 01 January 2015, is, therefore, to optimise operations at the local sewage treatment plant and to convert it so that it is largely operated by automatic equipment. In addition, the 200km of pipes in the town’s water and sewage networks need to be maintained and extended. Three waterworks supply the 6,000+ local residents with drinking water. Focus here is being put on improving the way the different areas are connected to one another, so that the infrastructure can be optimised and the customers can benefit from a higher quality of water and stable water rates. 

An impressive concept from REMONDIS Aqua

  • Another immediate project is to set up a customer service centre which will be able to answer any questions the local residents may have about water management in their town. Moreover, modern technology is to be installed here to make the invoicing process easier for the company and its customers. As is so often the case, REMONDIS Aqua took part in a public tender to win this contract in Wyszogrod. Impressed by the clear concepts REMONDIS had drawn up regarding investment and facility management, both the local councillors and the mayor of the city, Mariusz Bienek, opted to enter into a long-term agreement with the company rather than with one of its competitors. 

    Further support will also be coming from the nearby town of Drobin, where REMONDIS has been operating a successful joint venture with the local authorities there to supply drinking water and treat wastewater since 2006. Plans are to collaborate on a long-term basis with the cities sharing both their know-how and resources.

    Impressed by the clear concepts REMONDIS had drawn up regarding investment and facility management, both the local councillors and the mayor of the city, Mariusz Bienek (2nd from left), opted to enter into a long-term agreement with the company

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