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  • Dear Readers!

    Germany has set itself some ambitious goals in its move to support global efforts to reduce emissions of ozone-depleting gases – first and foremost CO2. On signing the Kyoto Protocol, the governments agreed to reduce emissions so that global temperature increases are limited to below 2 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels. According to the Federal government, Germany’s contribution is to have cut its emissions by at least 40 percent by 2020 and by 80 to 95 percent by 2050 compared to carbon emission levels in 1990. This goal should primarily be reached by extending the country’s network of renewable energy sources and increasing energy efficiency.

    Germany has set itself some ambitious goals in its move to support global efforts to reduce emissions of ozone-depleting gases – first and foremost CO2. On signing the Kyoto Protocol, the governments agreed to reduce emissions so that global temperature increases are limited to below 2 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels. According to the Federal government, Germany’s contribution is to have cut its emissions by at least 40 percent by 2020 and by 80 to 95 percent by 2050 compared to carbon emission levels in 1990. This goal should primarily be reached by extending the country’s network of renewable energy sources and increasing energy efficiency.

    The country’s simultaneous exit from nuclear power, however, has been like starting an experiment with an uncertain outcome. It has certainly got the network technicians reacting nervously to the slightest glitch in the system – as could be seen recently during the partial solar eclipse in Germany. In extreme cases, there can be fluctuations of up to fourteen gigawatts an hour – the result of the rapid growth of renewable energy sources – and these must be compensated for with electricity generated from fossil fuels. This is making it extremely difficult for the Federal government to reach its climate goals and so it is essential that moves are made to find alternative ways of cutting emissions. This is where the recycling sector can help. Aside from the fact that our sector is the only industry to have succeeded in completely turning itself around – from being an emitter of greenhouse gases as a result of sending organic material to landfill, to cutting carbon emissions through recycling and thermal treatment – there are still a number of other ways it can help prevent climate change. If the government makes the necessary adjustments now, i.e. with its new recyclables law, and ensures that the very most is made of the material and thermal potential of the recyclables in our waste, then our sector alone can achieve 6% of the 2020 climate goals. This has been proven by studies carried out by the Fraunhofer UMSICHT Institute. 

    Being one of the largest recycling, water and service companies, REMONDIS is already making an important contribution towards preventing climate change and conserving our planet’s natural resources. We would be very happy to be allowed to do even more. Introducing organic waste bins across the country is an important step towards achieving a more sustainable future. More and more often the public and private sectors are approaching each other to find ways of protecting the environment together to ensure future generations also have a world worth living in. Whilst it is certainly too early to say there has been a complete change of heart, one fact remains true: the public and private sectors are stronger when they work together – especially when they are looking to achieve ambitious goals!

    The term ‘sustainability’ may have been overused in recent years but it still depicts best the challenges that all industrial and commercial businesses must face – both now and in the future. Many of our customers have added our sustainability certificate to their business models. The Steigenberger hotel group, for example, has not only achieved the best recycling rates in their industry thanks to REMONDIS, their “Green Meeting“ concept, verified by our sustainability certificate, has given this successful hotel business a truly unique selling point. We are happy to help wherever we can! 

    Yours

    Thomas Conzendorf

Specialist seminar held every two years

  • Further training courses are an important component of REMONDIS’ global operations. Just one example of the many courses on offer is the specialist seminar held every two years for plant managers in Germany. For the first time ever, a joint event was organised for REMONDIS and TSR Recycling employees which took place in the German city of Magdeburg at the end of 2014.

State-recognised further training cours

The REMONDIS Group’s locations in Germany are all accredited specialised waste management businesses. This also includes appointing an operations officer responsible for running and monitoring on-site waste management activities. Every two years, these officers must take part in a state-recognised further training course. 

Greater collaboration, more practical relevance

Around 50 TSR Recycling branch managers in Germany are also operations officers. In the past, their courses were always given by external trainers. Initiated by TSR’s QSHE (quality, safety, health and environment) department, this course was reorganised and made even more practically relevant. Each seminar now consists of two parts. The first section continues to be held by external experts who are called in to inform the participants about any changes to environmental law or health and safety regulations. The new part of this seminar involves in-house specialists who talk about company-related subjects. Jörg Benn, head of TSR’s QSHE department, commented: “The feedback from the operations officers taking part in the first of these new courses has been extremely positive.”

Another change: the TSR operations officers were joined by REMONDIS employees, helping to promote the exchange of information between the two companies. With this course being such a success, the organisers have decided to continue this collaboration so that TSR and REMONDIS operations officers will be able to participate in joint in-house courses in the future, too.  

Environmental/health & safety management systems

The QSHE team has been using a new database system since the beginning of the year to help them with their complex work. There are more than 8,000 health and safety rules and regulations in Germany alone and this innovative system ensures operations at the TSR Recycling branches are run even more efficiently. There is, for example, an overview page for each individual branch which provides information on a number of subjects – such as upcoming inspections, seminar dates and vacant positions – and automatic reminders are sent to the users. Branch managers are also sent a daily report about environmental matters affecting their branch and any upcoming tasks. 

There are more than 8,000 health and safety regulations in Germany.

An additional database enables monitoring processes to be optimised in this field and makes sure any necessary correctional measures are implemented in the best possible way. The system used to transfer tasks between individual branches and delegate inspection duties to those responsible has also been simplified. Jörg Benn explained: “The system has a host of useful functions, helping us to fulfil our environmental and health and safety tasks. It also provides practical support – for example, making sure we renew our certificates on time.”

External legal experts will continue to deliver training courses for operations officers.

    The TSR Group: exemplary metal recycling operations

    The TSR Group has been part of the REMONDIS Group since 2006. Based in Germany, TSR is one of the leading companies in Europe for recycling scrap steel and non-ferrous metals. The company employs around 2,600 people at 150 business locations across the globe and handles more than seven million tonnes of metal a year. Its portfolio of services ranges from collecting, transporting and processing different types of metals, trading in metals and managing material streams as well as carrying out demolition work and industrial services. Metal recycling is a highly effective way of protecting the environment as it conserves primary raw materials and helps to prevent climate change. 

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